part 2 – how to log in to your amazon ec2 dogeminer

In part 1 we covered the groundwork you need in order to get a miner instance up and running on amazon’s servers. Now we are going to log in and put your info to work.

Before we log in to your instance, we need to set up a worker in your pool. Most will set one up for you by default, but you want to double check. Log in to whatever pool you selected. I suggested doge.hashfaster.com. Go to the worker section on the left side of the page. you should have a section that has worker configurations in it.
pool workers
It will have your username followed by a box, and another box for a password. Make easy to remember, short entries. The general practice is to use numbers in the first and a single character in the second. The only harm someone could do with this info is that they could mine for you! Make it simple. You don’t want to mine and have it not get credited to your account. Look at the worker info again and remember it. It should be in the form of username.1:password for instance, mine is tinyenormous.1:x

In order to log in to your instance you need
-your key (from amazon)
-the ip address of the instance

There are a lot of ways to ssh, but I’m going to use the terminal.

First I’m going to change the permissions on the key.

chmod 400 /path/to/your/key

next I’m going to wait until the instance shows up in the dashboard and copy the ip address.

Then I type

ssh -i /path/to/your/key ubuntu@PasteYourIPRightHere

and you should be in! On log in, the first prompt will ask you for your pool server address. This will look like
stratum+tcp://stratum-us.doge.hashfaster.com:3339
note that it begins with stratum+tcp and ends with :3339. Those things may change from server to server, but it’s important to have them in there and correct.

Next up is your WORKER username and password.
Enter it exactly as I showed it above
username.1:x

Hit return and your miner will spring to life! In order to check on it’s progress type
cat minerd.log
and it will read the log that your miner is writing.

After a few minutes your pool dashboard should show your speed on it. The pool dashboard number is often off, and should only really be used in order to see if you have successfully connected.
Screen Shot 2014-01-21 at 1.14.02 PM
This is obviously just the beginning of cloud mining, so feel free to poke around, fire up more instances, or tweak the settings!
(if this guide has proven useful to you, feel free to tip me in dogecoin at DB7UPpjsUqdWvDPxJcUdnZ3Ymtb4K2KBNQ or send me any type of coin via cryptsy at c99b5ef67fdd3f7e3900b3e8d52f1e37c1197a00 )

How to mine dogecoins with amazon’s ec2 servers. Mining in the cloud!

I’ve seen a few tutorials out there showing how to mine dogecoins, bitcoins, or litecoins in the cloud. None of them were as complete as I wanted them to be, so I’m putting this post together.
Dogecoin Startup screen
WHY mine using amazon’s servers? Good question. Generally setting up a mining computer will be cheaper in the long run, but it involves more technical know-how and it involves a lot more money. You have to pick out the ‘right’ motherboard, graphics card, hard drive, a case, and then you have to put it all together and get it to work. With Amazon’s servers, you could be up and running in 20 minutes. Using your own hardware also means that you are capped at a certain rate. If the price of dogecoin increases 200% tomorrow, then you could simply fire up more servers. It would take a lot longer to order up the parts for more mining computers. The downside is that amazon’s prices fluctuate, and amazon will rent you a computer that will barely break even, or not make a profit. That onus is on you in order to do the math.

HOW to mine dogecoins on amazon.

1 – Download the dogecoin client – from here. Run it and let it sync. It will take a long time (days!) but it will run in the background and you don’t need to wait for it to finish in order to continue on.

2 – Get your dogecoin address – In the dogecoin client go to the third tab in. “Much Recieve” Select the only entry and hit the “copy Address” button. This string of characters is similar to your checkbook routing number. This is where you will get paid for your mining. Save this number somewhere, you will need it later.
dogecoin wallet

3 – Join a pool – Mining is a lot like playing the lottery. You try and try and eventually win. If you have an underpowered machine, then it may take a VERY, VERY, long time for you to ever find a winner. Consequently, people have created “pools” where everyone mines together and then splits the winnings based on how hard they worked. This is generally the better way to do it, as you will be paid more consistently. My current favorite is hashfaster.

4 – Join an exchange – Cryptsy will allow you to trade your dogecoin for bitcoin, litecoin, or a lot of other coins. This will let you hedge your bets and give you a place to swap one coin for another. Join here, we’ll come back to this in step 2.

5 – (finally!) Set up an ec2 account – Sign up here for the ec2 free tier. Don’t worry, they won’t charge you for anything until you start renting servers.

5a – Create an instance – Once logged in to ec2, click on “Instances” on the left side, and then on “Launch Instance” on the top.
Launch ec2 instance

5b – Find my AMI – On the left side click on “Community AMIs” and then type tinyenormous into the search box. I should probably explain what this means. I have configured a machine image so that it will start mining as soon as it starts up and is configurable. You could do this if you wanted to, but it is easier to simply use the one that I have already set up.
Search for “TINYENORMOUS” and you should find mine. Just to be safe, here are the specific ID numbers of the authentic ones.

ami-2b5f6242 – east coast
ami-8ae4d6cf – california
ami-eaddbcda – oregon
ami-f3ac32c9 – sydney
ami-e60553b4 – singapore
ami-a3a4cda2 – Tokyo

find my AMI

5c – Choose an instance type – In this section you will pick the “computer” that you will be renting. This AMI is going to be cpu mining, so the number of vCPUs is the most important thing. Generally you will get ~4.5k per cpu. Amazon has configurations that run anywhere from 1 to 32 cpus. It doesn’t matter if you have one machine running 32 cpus or 32 machines running one, so check the prices and find the sweet spot. In order to find the prices you can do two things. The first way is to select a configuration and hit the next button. Then hit the “show spot prices” radio button on the next screen. This shows you the current pricing for that configuration. The other way is to open up a new ec2 tab in your browser and click “spot requests” on the left side and then “pricing history” on the top. That way will show you a graph of prices over time.

Screen Shot 2014-01-21 at 10.44.07 AM

spot prices graph

5d – Configure your instance – Now you have picked the best value of $/cpu and you know what the market rate is. In the next page, titled “Step 3: Configure Instance Details” click on the “request spot instances” button and put in a bid equal to or higher than the minimums. You can limit the amount of time that the request will be valid for by putting a time into the “request valid from” and “request valid to” fields, and you can click the “persistent request” button if you want the instance to launch again after it is shut down.
Here is an interesting thing about ec2 bidding. If the average price goes above what you are currently paying then your computer will get shut down. The only way to prevent this is to either big well above the minimum bid, or to not bid. If you don’t click the “request spot instance” button, then amazon will charge you top-dollar for every instance but won’t kick you off.

configure instance

5e – Once you have your bid figured out, hit next until you get to step 6 (on amazon). In this page you will configure your security settings. You don’t want anyone in the world to be able to log in to your instance, so you are going to set it to only allow connections from the i.p. address you are using. Go to whatismyip.com and copy your ip address. Now go back to amazon, hit “add rule” select ssh, and then paste your ip in the box all the way to the right. Amazon will suggest you add /32 to the end and you should do it. If there is a rule above the one you created then delete that by hitting the circle with an x in to the right side. Now hit “review and launch” on the right side.

5f – The last step in getting a spot server bid in is to set up a key pair. This is a small file that helps amazon verify that you are indeed the owner when you connect to the computer. On the popup select “create a new key pair” then download it, and click on the “I accept” terms and conditions.

5g – Congratulations! You have now submitted your bid. If you go to spot requests you should see your request being processed. Provided you bid high enough it will be fulfilled and should show up under “instances” shortly. If it says “price-too-low” under status then your bid wasn’t high enough to win.

In part 2 I will show you how to log in to the instance and update it so that it is mining for you!
(if this guide has proven useful to you, feel free to tip me in dogecoin at DB7UPpjsUqdWvDPxJcUdnZ3Ymtb4K2KBNQ or send me any type of coin via cryptsy at c99b5ef67fdd3f7e3900b3e8d52f1e37c1197a00 )

Hack saturday – spend $25 free on amex @ small business

American express has a one a year campaign where they will reimburse you $25 if you register your amex card online and spend more than 25 at a participating small business. Just to reiterate, here are the two rules
1) register your (amex) card online at http://shopsmall.com
2) buy a minimum of $25 worth of stuff from an amex approved small business. Want to find one? Check out their online small business finder.

Just so you know that this isn’t “too good to believe” you can see that I did it last year and got a bunch of free gear from sparkfun.

So here is why this is hacky enough to go up on my blog. The small businesses don’t have to be local to you. They just need to be on the map. I’ve looked for a bunch of my favorite small open source hardware / reprap stores and have a small list. The most difficult part is that you need to know the store’s physical address, and their name according to amex. I’m sure that I have missed some just because they might have their cc account under a different name than their actual store name.

Here’s my list:
pololu
makerbot
inventables
artisans asylumn
matterhackers
protoparadigm
robotshop
hobby fever
DIY Drones (3d robotics)
you do it electronics

NOT eligible – post with the zip code and address if you can find that they are actually there. I would LOVE that.
shapeways
sparkfun :(
ponoko
adafruit
emsl
printrbot

It’s not too late to register, and I haven’t picked out my list yet. PLEASE post your thoughts for any hacker friendly small businesses that accept amex, or even better – check them out on the map and post back here

CHDK Compatible Powershot SD series cameras


SD Series

The SD series is a slightly higher level version of the A series. They have nice metallic-looking rounded bodies. They have a very pocketable size, and they feel very good in the hand. Their battery life is somewhat a limitation due to their size and their batteries are generally tiny things with external chargers. These cameras can make for a great walk around point and shoot, or a platform for a more involved level of tinkering. With a big enough external battery they could make for a great motion detection photo system, and their small size means that you could tuck them in a dark corner and unobtrusively capture a timelapse or two.

———————–

Canon Powershot SD30 5MP Digital Elph Camera with 2.4x Optical Zoom (Tuxedo Black)

Price: $259.00

4.3 out of 5 stars (50 customer reviews)

8 used & new available from $45.00

Canon Powershot SD300 4MP Digital Elph Camera with 3x Optical Zoom

Price: $44.99

4.0 out of 5 stars (111 customer reviews)

10 used & new available from $44.99

Canon Powershot SD400 5MP Digital Elph Camera with 3x Optical Zoom

Price: $429.00

4.1 out of 5 stars (190 customer reviews)

17 used & new available from $26.99

Canon Powershot SD500 7.1MP Digital Elph Camera with 3x Optical Zoom

Price: $524.99

4.1 out of 5 stars (170 customer reviews)

11 used & new available from $45.00

Canon Powershot SD550 7.1MP Digital Elph Camera with 3x Optical Zoom (Beige)

Price: $699.99

4.3 out of 5 stars (155 customer reviews)

11 used & new available from $45.00

Canon PowerShot SD600 6MP Digital Elph Camera with 3x Optical Zoom

Price: $350.01

4.5 out of 5 stars (513 customer reviews)

17 used & new available from $29.27

Canon PowerShot SD630 6MP Digital Elph Camera with 3x Optical Zoom

Price: $494.01

4.6 out of 5 stars (250 customer reviews)

22 used & new available from $27.99

Canon PowerShot SD700 IS 6MP Digital Elph Camera with 4x Image Stabilized Zoom

Price: $45.78

4.5 out of 5 stars (325 customer reviews)

9 used & new available from $45.78

Canon PowerShot SD750 7.1MP Digital Elph Camera with 3x Optical Zoom (Silver)

Price: $399.97

4.5 out of 5 stars (611 customer reviews)

32 used & new available from $39.28

Canon PowerShot SD770 IS 10MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom (Silver)

Price: $299.00

4.6 out of 5 stars (430 customer reviews)

9 used & new available from $39.99

Canon PowerShot SD780IS 12.1 MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom and 2.5-inch LCD (Black)

Price: $339.99

4.3 out of 5 stars (844 customer reviews)

43 used & new available from $35.00

Canon PowerShot SD790IS 10MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom

Price: $250.00

4.4 out of 5 stars (263 customer reviews)

13 used & new available from $40.00

Canon PowerShot SD800 IS 7.1MP Digital Elph Camera with 3.8x Wide Angle Image-Stabilized Optical Zoom

Price: $49.95

4.5 out of 5 stars (594 customer reviews)

10 used & new available from $49.95

Canon PowerShot SD870IS 8MP Digital Camera with 3.8x Wide Angle Optical Image Stabilized Zoom (Silver)

Price: $499.99

4.3 out of 5 stars (494 customer reviews)

17 used & new available from $60.00

Canon PowerShot SD880IS 10MP Digital Camera with 4x Wide Angle Optical Image Stabilized Zoom (Silver)

Price: $85.00

4.2 out of 5 stars (303 customer reviews)

11 used & new available from $85.00

Canon PowerShot SD890IS 10MP Digital Camera with 5x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom

Price: $549.99

4.2 out of 5 stars (237 customer reviews)

10 used & new available from $99.88

Canon PowerShot SD900 Titanium 10MP Digital Elph Camera with 3x Optical Zoom

Price: $69.99

4.4 out of 5 stars (134 customer reviews)

11 used & new available from $69.99

Canon PowerShot SD950IS 12.1MP Digital Camera with 3.7x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom (Titanium)

Price: $799.95

4.4 out of 5 stars (181 customer reviews)

4 used & new available from $169.95

Canon Powershot SD990IS 14.7MP Digital Camera with 3.7x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom (Black)

Price: $269.99

4.5 out of 5 stars (191 customer reviews)

7 used & new available from $99.99

Canon PowerShot SD1000 7.1MP Digital Elph Camera with 3x Optical Zoom (Silver)

Price: $289.99

4.4 out of 5 stars (914 customer reviews)

26 used & new available from $48.49

Canon PowerShot SD1100IS 8MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom (Silver)

Price: $353.99

4.5 out of 5 stars (1008 customer reviews)

19 used & new available from $29.95

Canon PowerShot SD1200IS 10 MP Digital Camera with 3x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom and 2.5-inch LCD (Silver)

Price: $389.99

4.3 out of 5 stars (795 customer reviews)

12 used & new available from $55.00

Not linked – SD850
———————–

As with every camera purchase, you’ll need to make sure that you end up with an appropriate memory card (or two), a battery, and charger. If you buy new this is less of a concern, but a lot of these cameras are only really available on the used market so keep an eye out for what accessories are bundled with the camera.

Go Back to the CHDK compatible overview page

CHDK compatible Powershot A series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot ELPH series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot S series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot SD series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot SX series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot G series cameras

CHDK Compatible Powershot S series cameras

S Series
The S series is where best buy thinks that the line between point and shoots and SLRs starts to get blurry. These are a bigger form factor, and the are not pocketable. They may look like a dslr from a distance, but the lens is not detachable. This series generally has a nice long optical zoom length but doesn’t win many style points. These cameras can be picked up pretty cheap (*used) because they aren’t the sharpest looking canons on the market. (body-wise, not image-wise) They still can have great optical quality and their larger size enables both larger screens and longer lasting batteries. If all that you care about is the picture then these might make a good tradeoff of price per pixel.



Not linked – S5

As with every camera purchase, you’ll need to make sure that you end up with an appropriate memory card (or two), a battery, and charger. If you buy new this is less of a concern, but a lot of these cameras are only really available on the used market so keep an eye out for what accessories are bundled with the camera.

Go Back to the CHDK compatible overview page

CHDK compatible Powershot A series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot ELPH series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot S series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot SD series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot SX series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot G series cameras

CHDK Compatible Powershot ELPH cameras

Elph Series
The ELPH Series are good looking cameras with metal bodies. They are a small form factor camera and easily pocketable. These are a good choice if you are using chdk to get a few more features from your point and shoot, but you don’t want to do any hardware hacking or explore manual modes. Enabling RAW format on these cameras could easily be worth the effort, even if you didn’t play around with many of CHDK’s other features.


Not linked – ELPH 300 500

As with every camera purchase, you’ll need to make sure that you end up with an appropriate memory card (or two), a battery, and charger. If you buy new this is less of a concern, but a lot of these cameras are only really available on the used market so keep an eye out for what accessories are bundled with the camera.

Go Back to the CHDK compatible overview page

CHDK compatible Powershot A series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot ELPH series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot S series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot SD series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot SX series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot G series cameras

CHDK Compatible Powershot SX series cameras

SX Series
The SX series is pretty similar to the S series. It is too big for a point and shoot, yet lacks a lot of the functionality of a dslr. These cameras can be picked up pretty cheap (*used) because they aren’t the sharpest looking canons on the market. They still can have great optical quality and their larger size enables both larger screens and longer lasting batteries. If all that you care about is the picture then these might make a good tradeoff of price per pixel.


Not linked – SX150 SX210 SX 220

As with every camera purchase, you’ll need to make sure that you end up with an appropriate memory card (or two), a battery, and charger. If you buy new this is less of a concern, but a lot of these cameras are only really available on the used market so keep an eye out for what accessories are bundled with the camera.

Go Back to the CHDK compatible overview page

CHDK compatible Powershot A series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot ELPH series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot S series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot SD series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot SX series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot G series cameras

CHDK Compatible Powershot A series cameras

    A Series

The A series has the highest number of supported cameras. They generally aren’t all that fashionable, but the 1000 series and above all look pretty slick and are thin. These can make for good, reliable chdk installs in situations where you the camera is in a degree of danger. The lower number / earlier cameras are also more likely to run off of AA batteries. That makes it easier to get a good deal on a used one without the charger and it also means that there are easier battery replacement options. One other good aspect is that bigger cameras can be easier to disassemble in case you are looking to create a new enclosure or tap into the wiring for the buttons.

Canon PowerShot A460 5.0MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom (Silver)
Canon PowerShot A470 7.1 MP Digital Camera with 3.4x Optical Zoom (Red)
Canon PowerShot A480 10 MP Digital Camera with 3.3x Optical Zoom and 2.5-inch LCD (Black)
Canon PowerShot A490 10.0 MP Digital Camera with 3.3x Optical Zoom and 2.5-Inch LCD
Canon PowerShot A495 10.0 MP Digital Camera with 3.3x Optical Zoom and 2.5-Inch LCD (Blue)
Canon PowerShot A530 5MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom
Canon PowerShot A540 6MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom
Canon PowerShot A550 7.1MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom
Canon PowerShot A560 7.1MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom
Canon PowerShot A570IS 7.1MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom
Canon PowerShot A580 8MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom
Canon PowerShot A590IS 8MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom
Canon Powershot A610 5MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom
Canon Powershot A620 7.1MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom
Canon PowerShot A630 8MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom
Canon PowerShot A640 10MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom
Canon PowerShot A650IS 12.1MP Digital Camera with 6x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom
Canon PowerShot A700 6MP Digital Camera with 6x Optical Zoom
Canon PowerShot A710 IS 7.1MP Digital Camera with 6x Image-Stabilized Optical Zoom
Canon PowerShot A720IS 8MP Digital Camera with 6x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom
Canon Powershot A800 10 MP Digital Camera with 3.3x Optical Zoom (Black)
Canon Powershot A1000IS 10MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom (Grey)
Canon PowerShot A1100IS 12.1 MP Digital Camera with 4x Image Stabilized Zoom and 2.5-inch LCD
Canon Powershot A1200 12.1 MP Digital Camera with 4x Optical Zoom (Silver)
Canon Powershot A2000IS 10MP Digital Camera with 6x Optical Image Stabilized Zoom
Canon PowerShot A3000IS 10 MP Digital Camera with 4x Image Stabilized Zoom 2.7-Inch LCD
3200 not linked
Canon Powershot A3300 IS 16 MP Digital Camera with 5x Optical Zoom (Silver)

As with every camera purchase, you’ll need to make sure that you end up with an appropriate memory card (or two), a battery, and charger. If you buy new this is less of a concern, but a lot of these cameras are only really available on the used market so keep an eye out for what accessories are bundled with the camera.

Go Back to the CHDK compatible overview page

CHDK compatible Powershot A series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot ELPH series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot S series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot SD series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot SX series cameras
CHDK compatible Powershot G series cameras

How to buy a CHDK compatible camera on amazon

I LOVE CHDK. It lets you do so much cool stuff on canon powershot cameras, from shooting timelapses, to enabling RAW file options, to shooting video on cameras that never had video before. For the uninitiated, CHDK is an alternate firmware that your camera loads from the memory card. That keeps it relatively safe and allows you to reset your camera simply by switching the memory card! I’ve been using CHDK on and off since 2009, and I recently decided that I wanted a new camera to play around with. One of the toughest things about finding a good camera to run chdk on is that most, but not all canon cameras are supported. It is really hard to find a canon powershot and KNOW that it is compatible with chdk without doing a lot of work. Earlier today I had a tab open with the CHDK FAQ and a page open on amazon. I kept switching back and forth to find a good resolution, well featured chdk supported camera at a good price. That meant I had to keep a lot of info in my head. I quickly gave up on that and made this whole slew of amazon product links. It’s not the absolute best (that would be a database of megapixels, features, and price) but it definitely helps to hone in on your ideal price point.

Just in case you came here looking for a suggestion: go for the G series if you can swing it. They are amazing cameras in a small package. On the other hand – if you are dropping that much coin you might want to consider going for a dslr and running Magic Lantern on it. Magic lantern is like chdk, but coded explicitly for Canon’s dslr line.

On the other end of the line if you are just beginning and you don’t know how useful this will really be, don’t feel bad about buying an older camera. I would even recommend buying it used, but make sure that you get the charger and battery with it. Even if you get a mid level camera you will still end up with a better camera than the phone in your pocket!

Note: I’ve done my best in order to keep this clear and correct. I strongly urge you to cross reference any camera that you find with the CHDK FAQ before you click buy. So without further ado, here are the links. I plan on keeping it updated, so if it is useful – spread the word!

– UPDATE –
It seems as if Amazon doesn’t love the idea of having a solid page of ads, so they may have blocked them. I will break it up into separate pages by camera family in order to see how they feel about that.

CHDK compatible A series cameras
CHDK compatible ELPH series cameras
CHDK compatible S series cameras
CHDK compatible SD series cameras
CHDK compatible SX series cameras
CHDK compatible G series cameras

OpenSCAD tip: How to get formatting.

I’ve been diving into learning openSCAD lately, and it has sometimes been a rough road. One thing that has really helped me has been occasionally copying my script into a blank arduino window, letting it auto-format (command-t) , and then pasting it back into openSCAD. The formatting really helps illustrate where the brackets line up. You could do this with many other coding apps (ie not arduino) but that is the one I have handy, and one that most people who print will have installed as well.

Before:

After: